Just in time for Halloween — a video made by researchers shows how ticks that carry Lyme disease cut into skin and hang on for days.

greynotgrey:

Hey kid, you wanna see some pictures?

Perttu Saska - street apes of Jakarta

Very creepy

artandsciencejournal:

Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton artandsciencejournal:

Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton artandsciencejournal:

Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton

artandsciencejournal:

Globalizing the Tag

 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.

The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 

To view a video of the project in action, click here.

- Lea Hamilton

“The garden was a wonderful jungle,” Claire Walsh, his partner of 40 years, told me, by e-mail. “When I was there for the last time I nearly lost my footing as my ankles were trapped in roots and loose bricks, while brambles caught and tore my sleeves. Definitely on the side of wildness, a haven for birds and small mammals.” With a note of regret, she mentions that the house has been sold, adding, “Sadly, all this”—the untamed vegetation—“will have been stripped back, pulled out and tidied away” by the new owners.

Doubtless, they’ll mow the lawn.

artandsciencejournal:

Enter the Box


When watching the video Box (2013), it feels like watching a clip of a film studio’s 3-D graphics reel. In fact, Box is a live-performance piece created by the group Bot & Dolly that challenges the viewers perceptions of space and surface, by projecting images onto a moving box. Sounds simple enough, but the optical illusions that the performance creates questions logical space. An object goes from flat to three-dimensional within seconds, and then even within the structure, three-dimensional shapes begin to form.

The technology used behind this performance is called projection-mapping, where the projector follows the object perfectly, making it seem like a living thing, rather than a sedentary shape. Aside from projection mapping and a bit of human help, the whole project is controlled by robotics and engineering software, coming together to challenge the limits of artistic and technical expression.

If you haven’t already watched the video take a look! Feel yourself get hypnotized by the visual display on your screen. Imagine the endless possibilities of self-expression that can come from this type of technology.

-Anna Paluch

icanshowyoutheworldx:

READING BETWEEN THE LINES : church designed by Gijs Van Vaerenbergh : 2000 columns and 30 tons of steel, this structurally sound architecture uses horizontal plates to stratify its layers and appear to be transparent from select angles. reading between the lines : GIJS VAN VAERENBERGH

interior of seemingly floating architecture-- structure consists of about 2000 columns and 30 tons of steel

another interior of church- uses horizontal steel plates to stratify layers

looking up to the spire

(via revolutionarygardens)

I’ve been saying it for years, except when I first approached the st. Clair superior development corp back in 2009, it was considered too risky, expensive and logistically difficult…